Antithesis Examples and Definition of Antithesis

6575s, from Late Latin antithesis, from Greek antithesis opposition, resistance, literally a placing against, also a term in logic and rhetoric, noun of action from antitithenai to set against, oppose, a term in logic, from anti- against (see anti- ) + tithenai to place, from PIE root *dhe- to put, to do (see factitious ). Gain access to thousands of additional definitions and advanced search features ad free! JOIN NOWtrue love for another is the antithesis of the desire to control that person's lifeThese example sentences are selected automatically from various online news sources to reflect current usage of the word 'antithesis. ' Views expressed in the examples do not represent the opinion of Merriam-Webster or its editors. Writers and speechmakers use the traditional pattern known as antithesis for its resounding effect John Kennedy's famous ask not what your country can do for you—ask what you can do for your country is an example. But antithesis normally means simply opposite. Thus, war is the antithesis of peace, wealth is the antithesis of poverty, and love is the antithesis of hate. Holding two antithetical ideas in one's head at the same time—for example, that you're the sole master of your fate but also the helpless victim of your terrible upbringing—is so common as to be almost normal.

Antithesis Definition of antithesis in English by Oxford

What made you want to look up antithesis? Please tell us where you read or heard it (including the quote, if possible). Antithesis is a figure of speech which refers to the juxtaposition of opposing or contrasting ideas. It involves the bringing out of a contrast in the ideas by an obvious contrast in the words, clauses, or sentences, within a parallel grammatical structure. Antithesis is a  for the of contrasting ideas in balanced or. Plural: antitheses.

Adjective: antithetical. A perfectly formed antithesis, says Jeanne Fahnestock, combines,, and perhaps, in an language, even it is an overdetermined. The aural patterning of the antithesis, its tightness and predictability, are critical to appreciating how the of the figure can be used to force semantic opposites ( Rhetorical Figures in Science, 6999). Antithesis is very similar to, as juxtaposition also sets two different things close to each other to emphasize the difference between them. However, juxtaposition does not necessarily deal with completely opposite ideas—sometimes the juxtaposition may be between two similar things so that the reader will notice the subtle differences. Juxtaposition also does not necessitate a parallel grammatical structure.

Definition and Examples of Antithesis in Rhetoric

The definition of antithesis requires this balanced grammatical structure. The use of antithesis is very popular in speeches and common idioms, as the inherent contrasts often make antithesis quite memorable. Here are some examples of antithesis from famous speeches: Antithesis can be a helpful tool for the author both to show a character’s mindset and to set up an. If the antithesis is something that the character is thinking, the audience can better understand the full scope of that character’s thoughts. While antithesis is not the most ubiquitous of literary devices, some authors use antithesis quite extensively, such as William Shakespeare. Many of his sonnets and plays include examples of antithesis.

Arguably the most famous six words in all of Shakespeare’s work are an example of antithesis. Hamlet considers the important question of “to be, or not to be. ” In this line, he is considering the very nature of existence itself. Though the line is quite simple in form it contrasts these very important opposite states. Hamlet sets up his with this antithesis and continues with others, including the contrast between suffering whatever fortune has to offer or opposing his troubles. This is a good example of Shakespeare using antithesis to present to the audience or readers Hamlet’s inner life and the range of his thinking. It was the best of times, it was the worst of times, it was the age of wisdom, it was the age of foolishness, it was the epoch of belief, it was the epoch of incredulity, it was the season of Light, it was the season of Darkness, it was the spring of hope, it was the winter of despair, we had everything before us, we had nothing before us, we were all going direct to Heaven, we were all going direct the other way… All content on this website, including dictionary, thesaurus, literature, geography, and other reference data is for informational purposes only.

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked Required fields are marked *