SparkNotes To Kill a Mockingbird Study Questions amp Essay

That the young narrator of To Kill a Mockingbird goes by the nickname Scout is very appropriate. In the story, Scout functions as both questioner and observer. Scout asks tough questions, certainly questions that aren't politically correct, but she can ask these questions because she is a child. As a child, Scout doesn't understand the full implication of the things happening around her, making her an objective observer and a reporter in the truest sense. The reader should keep in mind, though, that To Kill a Mockingbird really presents two Scouts: the little girl experiencing the story and the adult Jean Louise who tells the story. The woman relating the story obviously recognizes that her father is exceptional. However, the child Scout complains Our father didn't do anything. .

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To Kill a Mockingbird Scout Jean Louise Finch Character

He never went hunting, he did not play poker or fish or drink or smoke. He sat in the living room and read. The child Scout marvels that her father knew she was listening to his conversation with Uncle Jack the adult Jean Louise marvels that he wanted her to overhear the conversation. Although the story takes place over the course of three years, Scout learns a lifetime's worth of lessons in that span. Here, too, the reader should remember that in many ways To Kill a Mockingbird is Scout's memoir the adult Jean Louise can better understand the impact of various events than the child living through them. Scout hates school because in many ways it actually inhibits her learning. Her teacher is appalled that she already knows how to read, instead of celebrating that fact. She is bored waiting for the rest of the class to catch up to her skill level, and she doesn't have more than a passing respect for either of the teachers she describes in the story. The most sympathy she can muster toward a frazzled Miss Caroline is to remark Had her conduct been more friendly toward me, I would have felt sorry for her. And she is offended by Miss Gates' comments about African Americans after her staunch and moving support for the Jews in Hitler's Europe. As a sign of her maturity, though, at the end of the story she realizes that she doesn't have much more to learn except possibly algebra and for that she needs the classroom. I don't know about others, but it helped me a lot to take the quiz over To Kill a Mockingbird before I had a timed writing the next day. It really helped me review and keep straight the facts in the novel. This is the first time I tried taking a quiz, and I will definitely do it again with other novels in the future. I actually already read the book in my English class about a month ago, and you have to admit, the begaining is kind of boring. And actually most of the book is boring. But the end was so good, that i just sat there and read for like, two hours. I really wanted to know why everyone calls it an important literature book. Needs a few more Quotations from Atticus, and also one quote will be useful as well: Your father's the same in the courtroom as he is in the street Miss MaudieSparkNotes is brought to you by. Visit B N to buy and rent, and check out our award-winning tablets and ereaders, including and. Below you will find five outstanding thesis statements / paper topics on “To Kill a Mockingbird” that can be used as essay starters. All five incorporate at least one of the themes found in “To Kill a Mockingbird” by Harper Lee and are broad enough so that it will be easy to find, yet narrow enough to provide a focused clear thesis statement. These thesis statements for “To Kill a Mockingbird” offer a short summary of different elements that could be important in an essay but you are free to add your own analysis and understanding of the plot or themes to them. Using the essay topics below in conjunction with the, you should have no trouble connecting with the text and writing an excellent essay. Thesis Statement / Essay Topic #6: Notions of Justice and Fairness in “To Kill a Mockingbird” by Harper LeeDespite the unwavering dedication of in “To Kill a Mockingbird”, the absence of evidence, and a moving courtroom speech, Tom Robinson is convicted of a crime that he did not commit.

This jury ruling causes both those who advocated Robinson’s conviction and those who were convinced of his innocence to question their notions of justice and fairness. As if a false conviction was not enough, Tom is eventually killed, and the sense of justice and fairness seem to be completely violated. Write an argumentative essay on “To Kill a Mockingbird” in which you establish what Lee is trying to convey regarding these two concepts that are so important to civil society. Questions that you might want to consider include: If justice and fairness are so elusive, how can Atticus and Scout continue to believe in them? , and Are justice and fairness conflicting concepts in “To Kill a Mockingbird”? Scout, for example, is ridiculed in “To Kill a Mockingbird” because she is a tomboy. Boo Radley is ostracized despite the fact that hardly anyone knows him. Reverse racism is also present in the novel, as evidenced by the threats against and his family as he defends Tom Robinson. Take one or more of the forms of discrimination in To Kill a Mockingbird and write an analytic essay in which you explain the forms and, if applicable, compare and contrast the types of discrimination. You should argue whether the lessons about discrimination that Scout learns are applicable to all types of prejudice, or whether they apply to racism alone. Thesis Statement / Essay Topic #8: The Moral Development of Scout and Jem in “To Kill a Mockingbird” Atticus is thoughtful and progressive. He has a logical empathy that is both intelligent and gentle. I think Scout has a definite sense that it is wrong to play games at the expense of Boo. Initially she is reluctant to try to pass Boo a message using a fishing line. She feels pressured by Jem and Dill despite her nagging conscience. When Atticus. To Kill a Mockingbird is a book written by Harper Lee. The To Kill a Mockingbird study guide contains a biography of Harper Lee, literature essays, quiz questions, major themes, characters, and a full summary and analysis. To Kill a Mockingbird essays are academic essays for citation. These papers were written primarily by students and provide critical analysis of To Kill a Mockingbird by Harper Lee. A widower, Atticus raises his children by himself, with the help of kindly neighbors and a black housekeeper named Calpurnia. Scout and Jem almost instinctively understand the complexities and machinations of their neighborhood and town. The only neighbor who puzzles them is the mysterious Arthur Radley, nicknamed Boo, who never comes outside.

To Kill a Mockingbird Thesis Statements and Essay Topics

When Dill, another neighbor's nephew, starts spending summers in Maycomb, the three children begin an obsessive and sometimes perilous quest to lure Boo outside. Scout is a tomboy who prefers the company of boys and generally solves her differences with her fists. She tries to make sense of a world that demands that she act like a lady, a brother who criticizes her for acting like a girl, and a father who accepts her just as she is. Scout hates school, gaining her most valuable education on her own street and from her father. Not quite midway through the story, Scout and Jem discover that their father is going to represent a black man named Tom Robinson, who is accused of raping and beating a white woman. Suddenly, Scout and Jem have to tolerate a barrage of racial slurs and insults because of Atticus' role in the trial. During this time, Scout has a very difficult time restraining from physically fighting with other children, a tendency that gets her in trouble with her Aunt Alexandra and Uncle Jack. Even Jem, the older and more levelheaded of the two, loses his temper a time or two. After responding to a neighbor's (Mrs. Dubose) verbal attack by destroying her plants, Jem is sentenced to read to her every day after school for one month. Ultimately, Scout and Jem learn a powerful lesson about bravery from this woman. As the trial draws nearer, Aunt Alexandra comes to live with them under the guise of providing a feminine influence for Scout. During the novel's last summer, Tom is tried and convicted even though Atticus proves that Tom could not have possibly committed the crime of which he is accused. In the process of presenting Tom's case, Atticus inadvertently insults and offends Bob Ewell, a nasty, lazy drunkard whose daughter is Tom's accuser. In spite of Tom's conviction, Ewell vows revenge on Atticus and the judge for besmirching his already tarnished name. All three children are bewildered by the jury's decision to convict Atticus tries to explain why the jury's decision was in many ways a foregone conclusion. Shortly after the trial, Scout attends one of her aunt's Missionary Society meetings. Atticus interrupts the meeting to report that Tom Robinson had been killed in an escape attempt. Scout learns valuable lessons about achieving the ideal of womanhood and carrying on in the face of adversity that day. Windsor Gardens is an independent-living apartment community for low-income seniors and those with disabilities. It is conveniently located in the Escondido in North County San Diego and is in walking distance of stores, banks, and restaurants. Windsor Gardens has on-site management and maintenance personnel for your convenience and safety.   There is a shared laundry facility, library, and media room, along with plenty of activities for varying interests. All tenants must be pre-qualified and there is currently a waiting list. Compose your essay in such a way as to edify and inform readers who are unfamiliar with this book. Follow the format outlined below. Your essay will be graded on the basis of the following categories: content (How informative is your essay?

), organization (Does it follow my format with a definite underlying structure? ), narrative voice (Does the narrative sound credible and coherent? ) and clarity (Are the examples that are given in support of the thesis clearly presented and explained in depth? Topic A –  Innocence and Experience – What are the major life-lessons that the younger characters in the novel ( Scout, Jem and Dill ) absorb as part of their coming-of-age in Maycomb, Alabama in the 6985s? You may pick one or more of these young people to write about and you may want to mention other kids in the story as well such as Walter Cunningham, Little Chuck Little, Burris Ewell, Cecil Jacobs and Francis Hancock. Topic B –  Sources of Enmity – What are the significant sources of tension (i. E. Suspicion, mistrust, class prejudice, racial prejudice,   snobbery, enmity, animosity, hatred) between various characters in the novel and what price is paid by certain characters for these antagonisms? For this topic, in addition to the younger characters mentioned above, you may want to concentrate on any of the following adult characters: Old Mr. Radley, Nathan Radley, Boo Radley, Miss Stephanie Crawford, Miss Maudie Atkinson, Atticus, Calpurnia, Lula, Zeebo,   Reverend Sykes, Aunt Alexandra,   Tom Robinson, Bob Ewell, Mayella Ewell, Sheriff Heck Tate, Mr. Gilmer, Judge Taylor, Mr. Link Deas, Dolphus Raymond, Miss Merriweather, Mrs. Farrow, Mr. Underwood. Topic C – Dimensions of Social Inequality – What does this novel have to teach us about the problem of human inequality and the divisions within human society? Write about specific dimensions of inequality in Maycomb, Alabama – i. The advantages and disadvantages that certain characters experience. Try to identify an underlying common lesson that unites each of these characters. Your paper may choose to focus on characters such as Boo Radley, Tom Robinson, Bob Ewell, Mayella Ewell, Burris Ewell, Mr. Cunningham, Walter Cunningham,   Dill Harris, Dolphus Raymond or any of the other characters mentioned above. The narrator and main character who begins her story at almost six years old. A rebellious tomboy, Scout has a fierce disposition toward any who challenge her, but at heart she believes in the goodness of people. Scout reacts to the terrible events of the book without losing hope in humanity. Scout's older brother, who is nearly ten at the beginning of the story. Jem is quieter and more reserved than his sister, and has very high standards and expectations for people. When these expectations are not met, Jem has a difficult time resolving his feelings. A friend of the Finch children, who is a little older than Scout, quite short for his age, has an active imagination, and exhibits a strong sense of adventure. He initiates the first expeditions toward the Radley house, and is Scout's best friend. His family life is less than ideal, and he tends to resort to escapism when confronted with difficult situations. Dill spends summers with his aunt, who lives next door to the Finch family. The father of Scout and Jem, Atticus is a lawyer and an extremely morally upright man who strives to deal with everyone fairly.

Atticus is sometimes overly optimistic, but his unshakable hope in mankind and self-created role as the town 'do-gooder' sustain him. Atticus' wife died when Scout was very small, and he has raised his children only with the assistance of Calpurnia, his black housekeeper and cook. A recluse who never emerges from his house.

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